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1916 CLASS BOOK 




V O I 1 ] > -f F T 


PUNCHARD HIGH SCHOOL 

Andover - - MassacKusetts 


PUBLISHED BY SENIOR CLASS 









i^*^i£ 




THE ANDOVER PRESS 
ANDOVER. MASS. 




THE PUXCHARD SCHOOL 



To our comrade and friend, 

Nathan C. Hamblin, 

we dedicate this book. 




A/oMLil^ C, T^a^uU^^^i^ 




Nathan C. Hamblix, Princ 


ipal 

Latin- 


101 Chestnut Street 


Eugene V. Lovely 


Science 


Ul Main Street 


Edna G. Chapin 




105 Chestnut Street 


Lois J. Reed 


Business 


48 Ehii Street 


Elizabeth INI. Loftus 


Histor)/ 


105 Chestnut Street 


Ruth K. Whiting 


Domestic Science 


2 Chestnut Street 


Percival M. Symonds 


Mathematics 


33 Chestnut Street 


Mary L. Smith 


English 


79 Chestnut Street 


Helen DeM. Dunn 


Frencli and German 

6 


2 Chestnut Street 




-Miss Loltus 



Mis 



Mr. Syojonds 
i Reed 



Miss Chapin 

Hamblin 



Mr, Lovely 
Miss Whiting 



Miss Smith 
Miss Dunn 



Class Book 33oartJ 



ANN S. LESLIE, Chairman 
LILLL\N M. McCarthy WALTER S. LAWSON 



Ct)e Mentor Class 




CORA ELIZABETH ABBOTT 

"Still achieving, still pursuing.'' 
Goldsmith Prize Speaking, 1914. Class Gifts 



CORA ELIZABETH ABBOTT 

RUTH ELIZABETH ABBOTT 

"rufus" 

" Who gives himself ivith his gift feeds three." 

Lincoln Spelling Match, 1915, First Prize. Barnard Prize Speaking, 
1916, First Prize. Senior Play. Essayist. 




RUTH ELIZABETH ABCOTT 



^uncbarU 1916 




DELIA MAUD BELISLE 



DAHLIA 



" The girl who laughs, heaven bless her." 
First Prize in Botany, 1914. Class Statistician. 



DELIA MAU.) BKLISLE 

GERTRUDE WELLS BERRY 

"^1 voice so soft, gentle and low." 

First Latin Prize, 1913. Barnard Prize Speaking, 1915, Second Prize. 
Barnard Prize Speaking, 1916, Second Prize. Vice-President. Senior 
Play. Valedictorian. 




GERTRUDE WELLS BERRY 



10 




^uncftarli 1916 



AUGUSTINE EDWIN BROWN 

"He doth iiothinfi bid frown.'' 
Baseball; Captain in 1916. Football. Treasurer Class. Senior Play, 



AUGUSTINE EDWIN HROAVN 



MADELINE MARGUERITE FITZGERALD 

■'maitdie" 

" Yohr heart's desires be with you." 




MADELINE MARGUERITE FITZGERALD 



11 



l^uncljarD 1916 




ANNA MARGARET HARNEDi 

"She gazed — she reddened like a rose." 
Goldsmith Prize Speaking, 1915. Senior Play. Class Prophet. 



ANNA MARGARET HARNEDY 



CATHERINE LOUISE HICKEY 

"cath" 

"But still her tongue ran on." 
Lincoln Spelling Match, 1916, Second Prize. 




^M>^. -'m^.^A^k. 



CATHERINE LOTISE HICKEY 



12 



^uncIiarD 19 16 




AGNES BLANCHE HIGGINS 

"7* she not passing fair?" 
Goldsmith Prize Speaking, 1912, 1913. 



AGNES BLANCHE HIGGINS 

ELDRED WILSON LARKIN 
"larky" 

" Xor is the wide icorld ignorant of his worth." 

Baseball; Captain in 1915. Football. Goldsmith Prize Speaking, 1914. 
First Prize. Barnard Prize Speaking, 1915, First Prize. Class President. 
Editor-in-Chief of Ensign 1915-1916. Senior Play. Class Historian. 




ELDRED WILSON LARKIN 



13 



^uncfjarD 1916 




WALTER SCOTT LAWSON 

<< 9 9 

YUGGA 

^'Let me not burst in ignorance. '^ 

Football; Captain in 1915. Baseball. Class Book Board. President 
of Athletic Association. 



WALTER SCOTT LAWSOX 



ANN STRACHAN LESLIE 

"Oh, that laugh of thine ivill cause thee trouble yet." 
Ensign Board. Class Book Board. Senior Play. Salutatorian. 




ANN STRACHAX LESLIE 



14 



punctjarU 1916 




LILLIAN MARGUERITE IMcCARTHV 

"sxow" 
"Drink io me only niih thine eyes." 
Senior Play. Class Book Board. 



LILLIAN' MARGUERITE M( CARTHY 



PEARL MARGARET McCOLLUM 

"lady" 

"Friends, 'tis the hour to sing." 




PEARL MARGARET M< COLLI M 



15 



^undiarD 1916 




JOSEPH WILLIAM McXALLY 

"jeff" 

"Let me have men about me that are J at.'' 
Baseball. Barnard Prize Speaking, 1915. Senior Play. Cla.ss Will. 



JOSEPH WILLIAM McXALLY 



JOHN DUFTON NOYES 

" Johnnie" 

"Soft! Who comes here?" 

Football. Goldsmith Prize Speaking, 1915. Manager of Baseball 
Team, 1916. Barnard Prize Speaking, 1916. Business Manager of 
Senior Play. 

16 




JOHN DUFTOX XOYES 



^unff)arli 1916 




ISABELLE STAFFORD PETERS 
"pete" 

Then let thy love be yoiimjer than thyself." 



Glee Club 



ISABELLE STAFFORD PETERS 



GLADYS ELISABETH RALPH 

"r.\lphie" 

'* Her face is fair, her heart is true." 



Senior Plav 




17 



GLADYS ELISABETH RALPH 



^unrljarli 1916 




WILLIAM JOSEPH RILEY 



WILLIAM JOSEPH RILEY 

"bill" 

" Your mind is tossing on the ocean." 
Baseball. Football. 



JENNY ROSELINE WETTERBERG 

"jen" 

'A daughter of the gods, divinely fair and most divinely tall." 




JENNY ROSELINE WETTERBERG 



18 



5^unct)arD 1916 




PAULINE FRANCES WOOD 

"joe" 

"As merry as the day is long.'' 



PAULINE FRANCES ^YOOD 



SARAH LEVINA WOODHEAD 

" SADIE " 

" Thou shah yiot knoiv the sound of thine ozvn tongue." 
Second Latin Prize, 1913. Essayist. 



19 




SARAH LEVIN A WOODHEAD 



^DuncljartJ 1916 




GUY WEBSTER 

" Then he will talk — good gods! how he will talk." 
Football Baseball 



Gl V WEBSTER 



20 



Class ^ong 



I 

Here, Classmates, side by side we stand, 

At life's broad, open shore, 

Resolved that '16 noblest be 

Today and evermore; 

In all, both earnest work and play, 

Uphold the Gold and Blue ; 

Dear Punchard, to thy name alway 

Be loyal, firm and true. 

II 

For thee, fair Alma Mater, 
And for our classmates all 
We'll faithfully strive onward, 
Where'er life may us call. 
Now as we leax^e thy halls so dear, 
We pledge our love to thee ; 
Within our hearts thy name revere 
To all eternity. 

IsABELLE Peters 



21 



Class flistorp 




HE entrance of the Class of 1916 into the Punchard School, like our departure 
therefrom, was accompanied by a wave of excitement that swept over the 
whole country. We came here just as people were beginning to cheer them- 
selves hoarse for Taft or Roosevelt or Wilson and we leave while shouts of 
exultation or groans of disapproval are still echoing from two great national 
conventions. 

The fact, however, that 191''2 was a campaign year was of only minor 
importance to us. The change of administration in which we were most 
interested was the one that came with our promotion to a new school. The question that 
troubled us was, "What will these powers that be do to us?" 

We soon found out. AVe were first divided into two unequal parts and distributed over 
Room -2 with its dull and dreary interior and Room 5 with its noisy seats. 

Then began the struggle with .r,y,z, and amo, amas,amat. Some of our number appeared 
to be struggling with unknown quantities and with the same distracted verb. The chief 
events of our Freshman year were football, baseball, and the Goldsmith. We were represented 
in the Goldsmith Prize Speaking by Miss Blanche Higgins and William Foster. On the 
football team, three of our class represented us and on the baseball team we were represented 
by four men. Miss Gertrude Berry secured the first Latin prize for the Freshmen class and 
Sarah Woodhead obtained the second honors. 

At the beginning of our Sophomore year most of us found ourselves hermetically sealed 
in Room 4, where we attacked our weighty problems with renewed vigor and among our 
achievements was the mastering of Caesar. The Geometry was felled by our constant corrosion 
of its "roots", and French and English were readily absorbed by our mental powers. 



23 



|0unft)arD 1916 

Miss Blanche Higgiiis and Eldred Larkin were chosen to represent us in the Goldsmith. 
Seven of our class made the football team and three made the baseball nine. Miss Delia 
Belisle was awarded the first prize in botany. 

In our third year most of us again went into cold storage in Room 4, while a few of us 
were allowed the privilege of being entombed with the Seniors in the dungeon darkness of 
Room 6. In the case of one of our members the cold of Room 4 "struck in". The brain of 
Lawson appeared to congeal and he was constantly found wandering, in a dazed condition, 
through the corridors. At last. Miss Whiting took pity on him and from that time on through 
the year he followed her about like Mary's "little lamb". 

In the Goldsmith, Miss Cora Abbott and Eldred Larkin represented the Class and the 
latter was awarded the boy's prize. In the Barnard Prize Speaking Contest, the essays of 
Miss Gertrude Berry and Eldred Larkin were chosen by the judges for the finals in the Town 
Hall. Eldred Larkin captured the first prize and Miss Gertrude Berry the second. The 
football team included five of our class and the baseball team had four of our members in 
its lineup. 

Our class tendered a reception in the form of a truck-ride to Canobie Lake, to the Seniors, 
and a jolly time was had by all. 

Last September those of us who had survived the rigors of a winter in Room 4, joined 
the advance guard in Room 6. Goggles now became more in evidence, adding to the learned 
aspect which we had acquired through three years of violent mental activity. A notable 
addition to our class was made in the person of one "Dinnis O'Hara", otherwise known as 
McXally. 

Six of our members made the football team and five made the baseball nine. Miss Anna 
Harnedy and John Xoyes represented us in the Goldsmith. Miss Gertrude Berry. Miss 
Ruth Abbott and John Noyes were chosen for the finals in the Barnard Prize Speaking 
Contest. Miss Abbott was awarded first prize and Miss Berry won the second prize. A 

24 



3^unct)art> 1916 

reception by the Juniors was given us in the November Club House and we were very 
pleasingly entertained. 

We have held parties at frequent intervals at the homes of different members of our 
class this spring and these will long be remembered by us as one of the most pleasant features 
of our high school career. The Class gave a play in the Town Hall to raise funds for the class 
gift and it was a great success in every way. 

Now as we leave the halls of dear old Punchard and our path separates, we cannot help 
hesitating on the threshold to ponder over our situation. 

While most people are interested in the results of the great conventions at Chicago and 
St. Louis, we are most concerned in the results of our departure from Punchard and the effect 
it will have on the communitv and on ourselves. 



25 



Class ^ropf)ecj? 



A reunion was called for the Class of 1916 in the year 1936 and I was delegated to look 
up our graduates. Lix-ing down in China at the time, I thought that since I had not seen 
the "Old Town" for nineteen years, I would come. But did I see the old town? No, indeed; 
it had grown to be a flourishing city with great stores, theatres and even aeroplanes. Not 
seeing anyone I knew, I decided to aeroplane to the "Phillips Inn" and dispose of my grip. 
When I was seated comfortably, I began to feel uneasy about my classmates. To my great 
astonishment I spied Pete Tyler, a little gray-haired man, of three feet six inches, running 
the aeroplane. Of course Pete had to tend right to business and had no time to talk. How- 
ever, he told me that he was still keeping bachelor's quarters and had not been away from 
Andover since he was graduated. I also learned that Gladys Ralph was employed in his 
Aeroplane Company as his time-keeper. 

At last, I reached my destination and instead of finding what I had supposed to be the 
"PhUlips Inn", I found a very beautiful hotel. On stepping into the office to register, whom 
should I see but my old friend, Isabelle Peters, the proprietress of the establishment. Poor 
Isabelle had been so unfortunate as to marry only twice, and losing both of her husbands was 
obliged to make her own living. After she had told me all her troubles, I informed her of 
my errand and you may rest assured she was a mine of information. 

Of course, I was given a beautiful room and, being very tired, went to bed early. The 
next morning while reading the World's Xeus, I discovered a fine article on the European 
war of 1914, written by Gertrude Berry who had won international fame as an historian. 

My trunk had not arrived and, having been invited to go to the opera with some friends, 
I journeyed down town and went into one of the large department stores to purchase an 
evening gown. The manager directed me to the latest Paris styles on the fifth floor. Seeing 

26 



^uncfjarD 1916 

an interesting gown on one of the models, I went very close to examine it. There with all her 
girlish beauty stood Madeline Fitzgerald, who greeted me warmly and fitted me out with a 
stunning gown. 

Isabelle had told me that Larkin was performing in the Stock Company at the theatre, 
and as we had some time to wait, we stepped in, just in time to see Larkin rush upon the stage 
to the accompaniment of soft music, and rescue the heroine, Cora Abbott, from the trapeze 
upon which she was performing. 

As we left the theatre an attendant offered us some handbills announcing that Ann 
Leslie would deliver a stereopticon lecture on the following evening. She was still with the 
Merrimack Mutual Company and was touring the country giving talks to lai'ge audiences 
on Insurance. 

The bill also announced that the Cosmopolitan Quartet from Buenos Aires consisting 
of Webster, Brown, Lawson and McXally, would make their appearance on the following 
week. 

While we were waiting for the aeroplane, we saw an illuminated electric sign which bore 
these words: 

BEAUTY PARLORS, TRAXSF0R:\L\TI0X WHILE YOU WAIT 
LiLLL\x M. McCarthy 

DBIPLES EXECUTED WITHOUT PAIX 
Pearl M. McCollum 

As I stepped into the elevator, I heard the shrill voice of Blanche Higgins. Blanche, 
clothed all in yellow, was trying to convince the clerk that because she was the leader of the 
"Women's Rights Movement", she should have the best room in the hotel. 

27 



There were so many things to do and to say, I deferred my return to China till the follow- 
ing month. 

Being anxious to renew acquaintances we decided to hold our reunion the next week 
at Isabelle's hotel. Notices were immediately sent out and a telegram was received from 
Catherine Hickey, the great cabaret dancer, at the Hippodrome in New York, stating that 
she would be present at the reunion to give us an exhibition of modern dances. 

The next day we journeyed to see the Health Exhibit which was being held in Mechanics 
Building. We were met by Jenny Wetterberg who, with the help of a megaphone, was inviting 
people to come in. She directed us to the cereal table, where we found Sarah Woodhead. 
She had been traveling through Massachusetts as a drummer for the "Shredded Pine Needle 
Biscuit Company" and had built up a large business. 

Tired but elated at seeing so many classmates, we were about to return to Andover when 
we noticed a large poster bearing the words, " Thousands die every year from poor milk/' In 
going over to investigate we beheld John Noyes demonstrating for the "Noyes Evaporated 
Milk Company". 

He informed us that Bill Riley was possessed of the world's goods and held the responsible 
position of Chairman of the Chicago Produce Exchange. He represented his Company at 
the exhibit and planned on spending a few days in Ballardvale before resuming his duties 
again. 

Having a few minutes to spare before our train left, we walked slowly down Washington 
Street, and noticed a familiar figure rushing towards us. It was that of Ruth Abbott, who 
looked very prosperous. Of course I was prompted to ask her if the world had treated her 
well, though had I thought seriously I should have surmised that Ruth early developed the 
gift of speech and was now singing the praises of the Roller Roller Talking Machine. 

Returning to Andover, we immediately began our preparations for the coming event. 
Suddenly a thought came to me of Delia Belisle, — what of her? After a course in nursing, 

28 



l^uncljnrD 1916 

she went to France to care for wounded soldiers. Her love for the Fi'ench and the fluency 
with which she spoke the language soon endeared her to a French officer, and now at our 
twentieth reunion, I find her a devoted citizen of France 

The last member of the glorious class to be heard from was Pauline Wood. After gradu- 
ation she studied very seriously and became a professor in Brown University. 

The night of the reunion came and as we gathered round the festive board we rejoiced 
that Time had not robbed us of any of our members. To add to the joy of the occasion Mr. 
Hamblin surprised us by his presence. He motored up from Oklahoma, having left the care 
of the State University in other hands. 

Soon after I departed for San Francisco en route for China, with a new spirit of gladness 
and with a deeper feeling of love for Andover, Punchard, and for each and every member 
of the dear old Class of 1916. 

Anna M. Harnedy 



29 



9lp!)abet 



A is for Ann, a demure little lass, 

B is for Blanche, liveliest one in our class. 

C stands for Cora who is moderate, not quick, 
D is for Delia, a regular brick. 

E stands for Eldred, an Artistic Scream, 
F for Fitzgerald who thinks she's a dream. 

G is for Gertrude who cannot be beat, 

H stands for Harnedy, ever smiling and sweet. 

I is for Isabelle whose feet are immense, 

J stands for Jenny who sometimes lacks sense. 

K is for Katherine who talks all the time, 
L stands for Lillian, a charmer sublime. 

M for McNally, a would-be sport, 

N stands for Noyes who is summoned to "court". 

O is for order; Room 6 has its share, 

P stands for Pearl with her nose in the air. 

30 



l^uncljarD 1916 



Q by necessity must be left out, 

R is for Ralph who can flirt, there's no doubt. 

S stands for Sarah who lives by rule, 

T is for Theodore, thin enough to keep cool. 

L I'll take out and substitute I, 

Perhaps you may guess the reason why. 

^' is for volleys you'll fire by and by, 

W is for Webster who thinks he's some "Guy". 



SI 



mentor Book ^tjelf 



Cora Abbott 
Ruth Abbott 
Delia Beosle 
Gertrude Berry 
Gus Browx 
Madeune Fitzgerald 
AxxA Harxedt 



A Maid All Forlorn 

How She Rates 

A Good-Hearted Girl 

The Cyclopedia of Education 

Out of Step 

She Would if She Could 

Innocents Abroad 



Catherine Hicket Bunch of Yarns and Rare Bits of Humor 
Eldred Larkin The Boss 

AValter Lawsox a Victim of Good Luck 

Sarah Woodhead 



Axx Le:sue 
LiLUAx McCarthy 
Pearl McColll"m 
Joseph McXally 
johx xoyes 
Isabelle Peters 
Gl-\dys Ralph 
WiLLi-\ii Riley 
Jexxy Wetterberg 
Paulixe Wood 
What's in a Xante? 



Anybody but Ann 

Secretary of Frirolotts Affairs 

Warded — A Chaperone 

Master of Silence 

Doicn on the Farm 

It 

Cupid's Understudy 

Ilappy-go-lvcky 

Wanted — A Hero 

The Eternal Laughter 



32 




C|)c fiebrilion of iHrje. -Bardap 

JrxE 9, 1916 
!MoRTOX Barcl.\y 
Ethel Barcl-^y. his irife . 
;NL\ry Axx O'Coxxor 
Ruth Carter, EtheVs sister 
Elsie Stuart, a neighbor . 
Mrs. Browx, Morton's sister 
Cora, her daughter 
Roger Stuart, Elsie's brother 
Dexxis 0'Har.\ 

ACT. I — The Dining-room at the Barclays' 
ACT II — (Five days later) The kitchen 
Prompter — Bl.\xche Higgixs 
Business Manager — Johx Xoyes 



Eldred Larkin 

Gertrude Berry 

Anna Harnedy 

Ann Leslie 

Lillian McCarthy 

Ruth Abbott 

Gladys Ralph 

Augustus Brown 

Joseph ^IcXally 



33 



€n0ign l3oarD 



Editor-in-Chief 
Business Manager 
School News Editor - 
Athletic Editor 
Subscription Agent 



Eldred Larkin 

William Brewster 

Ann Leslie 

Everett Hatch 

George Knipe 



34 





LETIC5 




Webster Adams 
No 



E. V. Lovelv, Coach 
Holt 



Eastwood Boutwell H. Larkiii H. Brown 

Morrill G. Abbott 

Riley Lawson, Captain 



Watson Crosby, Manager W. Cronin 

Geo. Brown 
A. Brown E. Larkin 



jTootftall 



Shortly after school opened in the fall of 1915, Mr. Lovely, the coach, issued a call for 
football candidates and about thirty men reported for practice. The candidates worked hard 
for two weeks and opened the season in an auspicious manner by defeating the Sanborn 
Seminary eleven by the overwhelming score of 53 to 0, on the Play stead. 

Next the Punchard eleven journeyed to Derry, X. H., where they played a scoreless tie 
with the Pinkerton Academy team of that town in a bitterly fought contest. 

On the 12th of October, our team romped home victorious by a score of 2i to against 
Methuen. 

Punchard again took the measure of the Sanborn Seminar\- boys on the 19th of October 
by the score of 46 to 0. 

Our first defeat came on October 22, when Pinkerton Academy came down from Derry, 
N. H., and trimmed us to the tune of 13 to 7. 

On October 30, we were again taken into camp, this time by the Beverly Lidustrial 
School, by the score of 13 to 6. 

For the second time, the Punchard eleven defeated the Methuen team by the score 
of 19 to 7. 

On Saturday, November 20, we defeated our old rival, Exeter High, at Exeter, in the 
annual game, by the score of 13 to 6. We had the heavier team but the Exeter lads fought 
hard throughout the contest and forced us to exert ourselves to the limit in order to win. 
The first touchdown was scored by Punchard in the second period, when Captain Lawson 
crossed the goal on an end around play from the 25-yard line. H. Larkin kicked the goal. 
Exeter scored in the third period on a forward pass but failed to kick the goal. We scored 
our second touchdown in the last period when E. Larkin shot a forward pass to Cronin from 
the 20-yard line. At the end of the game Punchard had the ball on Exeter's 2-yard line. 

38 




BASEBALL 



JSaseball 



Punchard opened the baseball season by defeating the Ahimni by the overwhelming 
score of 15 to 7. Our team played good ball considering that it was the first game of the year. 

The next game was at Wakefield and the Punchard boys came through victorious by 
the scoi'e of 13 to 0. 

On April 25, the Punchard nine played a sensational game with the Lawrence High 
School team which went twelve innings to a 4 to 4 score. 

Next the Wakefield team came to Andover for a return game and was again defeated, 
this time by the score of 12 to 4. 

On May 12, we journeyed to Derry, N. H., where we received a trouncing to the tune 
of 21 to 11. Both teams played poor ball in this game but Punchard's misplays came at 
critical moments, with disastrous results. 

We received our second defeat at the hands of Reading on May 19, at Andover. The 
contest was slow and many errors cost us the game. 

The next day we played and defeated the Danvers High School nine on Brothers Field, 
by the score of 7 to 5, in an interesting game. 

On May 26, we got sweet revenge on Pinkerton when we turned the tables on them by 
winning with the score of 13 to 6. 

The Methuen team were our guests on the Playstead May 31 and we had a lively 
time with them, finally sending them home on the short end of a 16 to 15 score. 

40 



f^uncljarti 1916 

At Reading on June 2 a close and exciting game resulted in a victory for Punchard, 3 
to 2, while on the following day a ten inning contest was won from Danvers at Danvers, 
the final score being 4 to 3. 

Lawrence cancelled its second game and the Exeter contest was postponed to June 14, 
on account of rain. Stoneham was defeated on the Playstead, Tuesday, June 13, in a 
closely played game by an 11 to 9 score. 

The following day at Exeter our hopes for a fitting finish to a successful season were 
shattered for Exeter won easily 1'^ to 1. 



41 



€llHB 





(©rintis 



We like our German, Miss Dunn is so kind, 
And if we forget things, why, she doesn't mind ' 
She merely corrects us and starts us anew, — 
I wish other teachers were like that, don't you? 

Lord Percy has a happy way 
Of making things so very clear. 
That only on the brightest day 
Can they be seen at all, I fear. 

Miss Chapin practices the art 
Of keeping perfect quiet; 
And she succeeds so well, I wish 
That others too would try it. 

In caverns neath the Samuel J. 
There is a land of empty shelves. 
Where sits a sorcerer every day. 
And teaches Physics to his elves. 

Miss Smith is so kind-hearted, 
She hopes our tales are true. 
If they are not too extra \'agant. 
She'll stretch a point or two. 



43 



|!)unchflrD 1916 



On Wednesday should a smell arise, 
Oh, conjure not what it may mean; 
'Tis but Domestic Science C, 
Which burneth incense to its Queen. 

To sections of the Sophomore class 
Miss Reed doth make a daily trip. 
To help their puny, infant hands 
To launch a Penman-ship. 

We pity Mr. Hamblin for the work he has to do 
In the very narrow confines of his little four-by-two; 
With one leg in the doorway and the other doubled tight, 
If no one's sharpening pencils, there is room enough to write. 

Miss Loftus runs our school affairs 
With hand that cannot fail; 
And though Ford cars are selling cheap, 
Our "Lizzy's" not for sale. 



44 



QAVINGS BANKS are insti- 
^ tutions established to en- 
courage people to save. 

We believe in beginning young, 
and we especially urge those who 
are just leaving school to make it 
a habit to save part of their 
earnings. 

You can start an account with us 
at $1.00 and systematic saving 
will increase your account sur- 
prisingly. 



Andover Savings Bank 



Better have insurance and NOT 
NEED it than NEED it and 
NOT HAVE it. 



INSURANCE OFFICES 
BANK BUILDING, ANDOVER 



Andover 

National 

Bank 



COMPLIMENTS OK 

C. A. HILL & CO. 

Electrical Contractors 

40 MAIN STREET Tel. 344-W 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

P. SIM EON E & CO. 

ANDOVER - - MASSACHUSETTS 


MIKE CROWLEY 

Tailor and Furnisher 

ANDOVER - - MASSACHUSETTS 


BUCHAN&McNALLY 

Plumbing- and Heating- 

PARK STREET - - ANDOVER 


Complimentary 


JAMES S. MAY 

Painter and Paper - Hanger 
Tinting and Kalsomining 

40 PARK STREET. ANDOVER, ^L\SS. 


P. J. DALY & CO. 

GROCERIES 

ANDOVER - - jVL\SSACHUSETTS 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

JOHN H. PLAYDON 

FLORIST 

TFiFPHf-NF- <^'*'=*^^"«US»= '1 





Park Street Livery Stables 
and Garage 



T. F. MORRISSEY & SON 

PROPRIETORS 



ANDOVER 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Develops Bookkeepers and 
Stenographers who are 



Mcintosh Training 

Wonderfully Expert and Efficient 

Our New Prospectus contains the secret. Send for it. 

The Mcintosh School of Lawrence 



LAWRENCE 
COMMERCIAL 

CAN HELP VOU 



SCHOOL 



EDWARD D. McINTOSH, Principal 

316 ESSEX STREET, LAWRENCE. MASS. Telephone 353 



Philip L Hardy 

General Contractor and Builder 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Cross Coal Company 



Concrete, Brick & Carpenter Work 
Dealer in Lime, Brick & Cement 



Telephone 171 



YARD, LEWIS STREET 



THE METROPOLITAN 

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3 MAIN STREET - ANDOVER, MASS. 


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ANDOVER - - MASSACHUSETTS 


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